Monday, November 2, 2009

Trains in the Garden

Gardening is about plants and the things that accent the plants or possibly the other way around such as in a rock garden or sculpture garden.
I have been into garden railroading for many years and have set up courses in several of the gardens I have had at different residences. Weekend before last was the monthly meeting of the North Texas Garden Railroad Club where we got to sit around and discuss garden railroading.
Below is the course.
Beginning on the north end of the long stretch of track is the garden loop. A few boulders, a tree, and assorted green plants highlight this area surrounded by the courtyard wall.



To go to and from this area the train has to pass through a tunnel under a waterfall (not shown and not very big)



It continues down the tracks along some herbs and small flowering plants on one side of a walkway and continuing under the covered porch area that enters into the living room of the house.


Finally it passes the last pillar near the control area of the train to the train yard where cars can be taken on and off. The white rocks portraying more of a railyard than a garden. The width of the area being easily seen here is the reason for the long layout and gardening areas.

Some of the plants not shown include rosemary and thyme, plants suitable for scale greenery.

4 comments:

Tatyana@MySecretGarden said...

Hi Jacob! I needed to see it to believe! Never heard about trains in the garden. Thanks for these great pictures!

Rebecca @ In The Garden said...

What a wonderful railway, it certainly makes a delightful garden addition. Great pictures! :)

Teresa said...

How fun and what a great excuse to have fun in your garden. I would have thought the weather would have been a factor but maybe not. That looks like it takes up alot of time though. who cares if it's what you love and it sounds as if you have combined two of you passions. Good thinking.

catmint said...

How quirky and how inspiring!! Thank you Jacob, for sharing and helping to extend the possible ways of thinking about gardens.